Politics

Ukrainian NYC Councilwoman Inna Vernikov Reveals Why She Backs Trump

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* One of five Republicans on the 51-person city council, Vernikov’s escape from the Soviet Union  and rise to councilwoman drew the interest of Trump

* Of her time under the old Soviet Union, Vernikov said: ‘There was nothing ever in the stores. I actually remember the empty shelves’

* ‘I remember my grandparents heating up water on the gas just to take a shower,’ she added

* ‘What I started seeing all those years ago, it really disturbs me because I’ve started seeing the comeback to socialism here’

* At the New York GOP convention at the start of this month, Vernikov described Putin as a ‘terrorist’ who has ‘lost his mind’

Ukrainian-born New York City councilwoman Inna Vernikov recalls standing in long lines for a grocery ticket only to find ‘bare shelves’ under the Soviet Union, and is terrified about the ‘comeback’ of socialism she is finding in the U. S.

One of five Republicans on the 51-person city council, Vernikov’s escape from Ukraine under the Soviet Union and rise to immigration and divorce attorney and later councilwoman drew the interest of even former President Trump.

The 37-year-old who represents South Brooklyn on the NYC council caught up with DailyMail.com upon returning from her trip to Florida to meet with Trump.

‘He definitely expressed a lot of concern about New York City, the city that he loves, that I love,’ Vernikov said of the former president. ‘We talked about how unsafe it is, we talked about the homeless problem, how the homeless have no place to go – they’re on the trains, the entire city has become very unsafe.’

Elected in 2021, Vernikov has become an impassioned voice for Ukrainians and a fiery critic of Vladimir Putin within New York politics.

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Faced with a target on their backs due to their Jewish heritage and little opportunity for a comfortable life, Vernikov’s family emigrated from Chernivtsi, Ukraine when she was 12 years old.

Of her time under the old Soviet Union, Vernikov said: ‘I actually remember quite a lot. There was nothing ever in the stores. I actually remember the empty shelves – coming to the supermarket there would be like a piece of bread, milk, vegetables; there would be very very limited choices as to what you can buy.’

‘You would have to stand in a long line for food,’ she added. ‘Every family would get rationed a ticket, you would only be allowed to buy a limited amount of food per family.’

Often times her family did not have access to running water, or hot water. ‘I would go to a well with my grandmother sometimes.’

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‘I remember my grandparents heating up water on the gas just to take a shower,’ she added.

Vernikov said that in Ukraine under the Soviet Union, it was ‘dangerous’ to be a Jew, or not to support the communist party.

‘If you were Jewish, you could not attend university, you couldn’t be outwardly Jewish. If your last name was Jewish you either wanted to change it or you wanted to move out to a city where you would be accepted.’

‘And if you were not a part of the communist party, you could be in a lot of trouble,’ she added.

While she is a former registered Democrat, Vernikov said that her background has ‘absolutely’ shaped her views. ‘I grew up in communism,’ she said. ‘What I started seeing all those years ago, it really disturbs me because I’ve started seeing the comeback to socialism here. We had left that, we had escaped all of that, and now we come here to see that.’

Vernikov said that most of her family has left Ukraine for either the U. S. or Israel, though she checks in on the situation on the ground with old neighbors, classmates and family friends, many of whom are working to care for those trying to escape … (Read more)

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