Politics

Ilhan Omar Has Paid New Husband’s Consulting Firm $878,000, Filings Show

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WASHINGTON — Rep. Ilhan Omar has continued quietly funneling hundreds of thousands of dollars to her new husband’s consulting film, including a $189,000 windfall in March — just weeks after they announced they had tied the knot, campaign data shows.

The payments between the Minneapolis Democratic congresswoman and Tim Mynett prompted at least one ethics complaint in 2019 after The Post first revealed allegations — made by Mynett’s then-wife in her divorce filing — that Omar was having an affair with the member of her political consulting team, who was at the time married to another woman. Omar was married to her second husband at the time.

But that doesn’t appear to have stopped the now-married couple, with Mynett’s E Street Group collecting $292,814.99 from his wife’s campaign this year for digital advertising, fundraising consulting and research services, according to the Federal Election Commission filings.

In total, Mynett has received a whopping $878,930.65 from Omar’s campaign since he began working for her in 2018, raising eyebrows among watchdogs and political law experts who say the practice is rife with cronyism.

The majority of those payments were made after the Somali-born lawmaker’s victory in the solidly Democratic district in the November 2018 midterm elections.

Omar is by far the E Street Group’s biggest client, according to Open Secrets data, with nearly one in every three of Omar’s campaign dollars going to her alleged lover’s firm as of last August, according to the Washington Examiner.

The FEC allows lawmakers to hire family members or spouses to work on their campaigns, making the arrangement technically aboveboard, but multiple political experts told The Post on Tuesday they believe the practice should be outlawed.

“It should not be allowed,” said attorney Richard W. Painter, who served as chief ethics lawyer in the George W. Bush White House.

“I think it’s a horrible idea to allow it, given the amount of money that goes into these campaigns from special interests,” he continued.

Now a professor at the University of Minnesota’s Law School in Omar’s hometown, Painter said star candidates in safe seats who raked in millions of dollars in campaign donations had the ability to enrich themselves and their families.

“We already have enough proble… (Read more)

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